Carroll named distinguished professor at Penn State

Jack Carroll, a researcher in the field of human-computer interaction (HCI) for over 40 years, has been named as the first distinguished professor for the College of Information Sciences and Technology (IST) at Penn State, effective July 1, when he completes his role as the Edward M. Frymoyer Chair Professor. This honor was approved by President Rodney Erickson based on a University-level review committee.

“I am greatly honored,” Carroll said. “It's a special thing to be recognized at home.”

Carroll, who has a doctorate in experimental psychology from Columbia University, is co-director (with Mary Beth Rosson) of the College of IST's Laboratory for Computer Supported Collaboration and Learning. He also is the director of Penn State's Center for Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), and has courtesy appointments as professor of computer science and engineering, instructional systems and psychology. His research interests include methods and theory in HCI, particularly as applied to networking tools for collaborative learning and problem solving, and the design of interactive information systems.

“Dr. Carroll is an internationally recognized scholar who has made major contributions to the field of human computer interaction and to Penn State,” said David Hall, dean of the College of IST. “He is highly deserving of the honor and title of distinguished professor.”

Prior to joining the College of IST in 2003, Carroll was a researcher at the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, a professor of computer science and psychology at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (VPI), a chair of the computer science department at VPI, a College of Arts and Sciences endowed professor at VPI, and a visiting faculty member at a number of universities.

Carroll has received many honors and distinctions throughout his career. He has been recognized as an Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Fellow, Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), a Fellow of the American Psychological Society (APS) and an Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Fellow. He has written 27 books and more than 300 research papers, and has received more than 50 research grants.   

In recent months, Carroll has been active with projects that examine the impact of technology on society. He is working on a project funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) that is intended to strengthen communities through a mobile time banking system. Time banking refers to community-based volunteering in which participants provide and receive services valued by the amount of time they require to perform.

In addition, his new book, “A Neighborhood in the Internet,” describes the groundbreaking research in Web-based community networks that he and his former colleagues at Virginia Tech conducted in the early years of the World-Wide Web, and provides an analysis of how those frameworks can be further developed with the technology that has since become available.

Carroll’s reputation as a pioneer in the field of HCI spans the globe. In recognition of his career, he was awarded an honorary doctorate degree in engineering from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid in Spain on Sept. 18, 2012.
 

Contacts: 
Last Updated January 24, 2013