Liberal Arts faculty receive National Endowment for the Humanities grants

February 17, 2020

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) recently announced $30.9 million in grants to support 188 humanities projects in 45 states and the District of Columbia. According to NEH Chairman Jon Parrish Peede, “the grants will expand access to the country’s wealth of historical, literary and artistic resources by helping archivists and curators care for important heritage collections, and using new media to inspire examination of significant texts and ideas.”

Three faculty members from Penn State’s College of the Liberal Arts are recipients of the prestigious grants.

Eric Hayot, distinguished professor of comparative literature and Asian studies, received a grant for a project titled “An Inquiry into Humanist Reason.” Hayot plans to use his grant monies to complete a book on the philosophical history of the divide between humanities, social sciences and science, and the future of humanistic thought.

Ran Zwigenberg, assistant professor of Asian studies and Jewish studies, will conduct research and writing leading to a book on how mental health professionals and other researchers understood the psychological consequences of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Zwigenberg’s project is titled “Nuclear Minds: Cold War Psychological Science and Hiroshima.”

Professor of Italian Sherry Roush received a grant for a project titled “The First Novel Specially Written for Women: An Edition and Translation of Jacopo Caviceo's ‘Peregrino’ (1508).” With her grant, Roush plans to complete the first English translation of the popular early Italian novel.

“It’s a great honor for three of our faculty to receive awards from NEH,” said D. Scott Bennett, associate dean for research and graduate studies and distinguished professor of political science in the College of the Liberal Arts. “These prestigious awards are highly sought after, and the fact that we have three winners demonstrates the high quality of our faculty and their scholarship. We believe that to be a great liberal arts college, we need both strong humanities and social science programs, and these awards reflect that.”

  • HAYOT

    Eric Hayot, distinguished professor of comparative literature and Asian studies

    IMAGE: Penn State
  • ZWIGENBERG

    Ran Zwigenberg, assistant professor of Asian studies and Jewish studies

    IMAGE: Penn State
  • ROUSH

    Sherry Roush, professor of Italian

    IMAGE: Penn State
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(Media Contacts)

Last Updated February 18, 2020