Global health is theme of National Library of Medicine traveling exhibit

January 28, 2016

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — With a revolution in global health taking place around the world, a traveling exhibit from the National Library of Medicine, part of the National Institutes of Health, examines communities worldwide — in collaboration with scientists, advocates, governments and international organizations — that are taking up the challenge to prevent disease and improve quality of life. "Against the Odds: Making a Difference in Global Health" is on display through Feb. 27 in the University Libraries' Life Sciences Library, 4th floor Paterno Library, University Park.

Recognizing all the factors that cause illness, communities are working on a wide range of issues — from community health to conflict, disease to discrimination. The people who face these problems play an important role in their resolution. Each of us can participate in the search for solutions and join a growing community of people committed to global health.

Accompanying the exhibit is a weekly Wednesday afternoon short video series, which focuses on each of the themes connected to the exhibit. Each set of videos are played at 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesdays in the Life Sciences Library, 4th floor Paterno Library, University Park:

Wednesday, Feb. 3 — Action on AIDS 
"Fire in the Blood" is a gripping look at corporate greed, government collusion, the cutthroat economics of medicine and health care, and the power of ordinary people to make meaningful change on a global scale. 

Wednesday, Feb. 10 — The Legacy of War 
"The Sore Problem of Prosthetic Limbs" shows how David Sengeh, with his MIT Media Lab Team, created a comfortable prosthetic limb.

"Out on a Limb" takes us on a trip through an intriguing science that is changing what it means to lose a limb.

Wednesday, Feb. 17 — Preventing Disease 
"How We Will Stop Polio for Good" — because almost eradicating polio is not good enough for a disease this terrifying.

"VSI: Vaccine Scene Investigation" shows the importance of vaccinating against diseases such as influenza, pneumococcus, shingles, tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis.

Wednesday, Feb. 25 — Global Collaboration
"Global Disease Detectives" provides an overview of CDC’s activities worldwide to identify and contain infectious disease threats, confirm their sources, treat the victims, and refine their surveillance.

"Michael Green: How we can make the world a better place by 2030" asks, “Can we end hunger and poverty, halt climate change and achieve gender equality in the next 15 years?” 

Those who anticipate needing any type of accommodation or have questions about the physical access provided should contact Sherry Roth at 814-865-1011 or ssr11@psu.edu in advance of their participation or visit.

Last Updated February 16, 2016