Kinesiology professors edit book on sport history

April 28, 2015

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. – Mark Dyreson, professor of kinesiology, and Jaime Schultz, assistant professor of kinesiology, have edited a sports history book published as a special issue of the International Journal of the History of Sport.

“American National Pastimes – a History” gathers the work of a team of historians of American sports in order to explore the origins, meanings and ideas of national pastimes — a nation symbolized by its sports.

Essays analyze the claims of particular sports to national pastime status, from horse racing, hunting and prize fighting in early American history to baseball, basketball and football more than two centuries later.

The essays also investigate the legal, political, economic, and culture patterns and the gender, ethnic, racial and class dynamics of national pastimes, connecting sport to broader historical themes. The book chronicles how and why the United States has used sport to define and debate the contours of nation.

The collection grew out of a 2012 workshop at Penn State. The book was published in December 2014 by Routledge Taylor & Francis Group.

Dyreson is an academic editor of the International Journal of the History of Sport, a former president of the North American Society for Sport History, a fellow of the National Academy of Kinesiology, and the author of several books and numerous essays on the history of sport.

Schultz is also assistant professor of women’s studies. She is the author of two books and multiple essays on sport, history and culture.

  • American National Pastimes – a History

    “American National Pastimes – a History” gathers the work of a team of historians of American sports in order to explore the origins, meanings, and ideas of national pastimes—a nation symbolized by its sports. It is edited by Mark Dyreson, professor of kinesiology, and Jaime Schultz, assistant professor of kinesiology.

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    IMAGE: Routledge Taylor & Francis Group

(Media Contacts)

Last Updated April 29, 2015