'Electronic Materials Synthesis' theme for 2016 Nelson W. Taylor Lecture Series

"Electronic Materials Synthesis" is the theme of the 2016 Nelson W. Taylor Lecture Series in Materials Science and Engineering. The lecture series will be held on Thursday, March 31, in the HUB-Robeson Center’s Flex Theater on Penn State’s University Park campus.

Nobel Prize winner and keynote speaker, Shuji Nakamura will give the keynote lecture “The invention of high efficient blue LEDs and future lighting” at 11 a.m. Nakamura is a professor of materials and the Cree Professor in Solid State Lighting and Display, and co-director for the Solid State Lighting and Energy Electronics Center at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He was awarded the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics for the invention of efficient blue light-emitting diodes, which has enabled bright and energy-saving white light sources.

The Nelson W. Taylor Lecture in Materials, sponsored by Penn State’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering, also includes three additional talks by Penn State faculty from the College of Engineering, Eberly College of Science and the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences. All talks are free and open to the public.

At 8:40 a.m., Roman Engel-Herbert, assistant professor of materials science and engineering, will present “New Opportunities in Electronic Materials Utilizing Strong Electron Correlation Effects.”

At 9:25 a.m., John Badding, professor of chemistry, physics, and materials science and engineering, will present “Confined Geometry Chemical Deposition for Next Generation Optoelectronics.”

At 10:10 a.m., Adri van Duin, professor of mechanical and nuclear engineering, will present “Building Bridges Between Atomistic-scale Simulations & Experiment -the ReaxFF Reactive Force Field Method & Application to CVD Growth.”

The Nelson W. Taylor Lecture Series in Materials Science and Engineering honors the memory of Nelson W. Taylor (1869-1965) who was head of Penn State's Department of Ceramics from 1933-1943. During his tenure as department head, Taylor refined the ceramics undergraduate curriculum, strengthened the graduate program, expanded ties with industry and was able to attract important scientists to the faculty. He is recognized as the individual most responsible for establishing the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences as a major center for ceramics research. The Nelson W. Taylor Lecture Series was established in 1969 and has consistently attracted scientists of international prominence.

For more information about the Nelson W. Taylor Lecture in Materials, please visit http://www.matse.psu.edu/about-us/lectures-and-awards/taylor-lecture/2016 online.

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Last Updated March 28, 2016