Penn State female powerlifters knock down antiquated stereotypes

Since it first began in 1986, Penn State's Iron Lions have been a powerhouse of strength for both men and women. The club team has gained national recognition through out the years, and is one of the few standout teams in the Northeast.

The women especially stand out as power players on the team, not only in competition but also in leadership. Many of the officer positions are held by female members, including the presidency.

“The sport is for any body type,” says sophomore Sarah Cruz-Ortiz, president-elect. “We're fit, we're in shape, and we're obviously strong, but we're not freaks.”

PSU female powerlifters knock down antiquated stereotypes

Since it first began in 1986, Penn State's Iron Lions have been a power house of strength for both men and women. The club team has gained national recognition through out the years, and is one of the few stand out teams in the Northeast. In early April the team entire team will travel to Orlando, Florida  to compete against 35 other schools for national championship. This is following both Penn State men's and women's teams placing first at the American Open last December in King of Prussia.

C Roy Parker

Cruz-Ortiz and teammate Courtney Lynch were two Penn State women who were named All-American last year at the national competition. Most of the other eight women who competed placed in the top half of their weight class.

The team entire team travels to Orlando, Fla., later this week to compete against 35 other schools for the national championship. This event follows both Penn State men's and women's teams placing first at the American Open last December in King of Prussia.

Next year the club will host two competitions — the annual Iron Lion and the Northeast Regional Championship.

Last Updated April 11, 2014