Penn State professors honored at Society for Prevention Research meeting

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. -- Penn State Professors Mark Greenberg and Karen Bierman were recently honored at the 2013 Society for Prevention Research Annual Meeting.

Greenberg, founding director of the Prevention Research Center and Bennett Chair in Prevention Science, received the 2013 Presidential Award. The Presidential Award is given to an individual or a team of individuals who have made a major specific contribution to prevention science research. This award is intended to be a lifetime achievement award for a significant body of research or theory in any area related to prevention that has had a major impact on the field.

Bierman, director of the Child Study Center and Distinguished Professor of Psychology, received the Prevention Science Award. This award is given to an individual or team of individuals for a significant body of research that has applied scientific methods to test one or more preventive interventions or policies. Individuals are recognized for their work in developing and testing prevention strategies.

Greenberg is one of the foremost authorities on the prevention of family violence and child delinquency, and the promotion of social competence in children. He is the co-creator of Promoting Alternative THinking Strategies (PATHS), a program designed to improve the social, emotional and cognitive competence of elementary-aged children. The curriculum, which has been implemented in more than 1,500 schools worldwide, is one of 11 programs designated as a Blueprints for Violence Prevention program by the U.S. Department of Justice and one of 25 programs designated as a model program by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

Bierman's research focuses on social-emotional development and children at risk, with an emphasis on the design and evaluation of school- and community-based programs that promote social competence, school readiness and positive intergroup relations while reducing aggression and violence. She is a leading authority on the development of peer relations and friendship, and a developer of preventive interventions to improve peer relations. Currently, she is the principal investigator for the NICHD-funded Head-Start REDI program (promoting school readiness with classroom-based and parent-focused intervention) and the FRIENDS project (promoting self-regulation among children with elevated attention-deficit hyperactivity symptoms). 

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Last Updated June 27, 2013