Lecture on FBI's Terrorist Explosive Device Analytical Center Sept. 13

Penn State students, faculty, staff, alumni and the public are invited to a free lecture, titled "The FBI's Terrorist Explosive Device Analytical Center (TEDAC)," on Sept. 13. The lecture will be delivered by Andrew English, an FBI intelligence analyst. The lecture event is the second of four presentations on forensic science, criminal justice and crime fiction in the 2010 Forensic Science Lecture Series. All lectures are free and will be held on Mondays from 12:20 p.m. to 1:10 p.m. in room 111 of the Wartik Laboratory on Penn State's University Park campus.

English will discuss his extensive bomb-related training and his 20-year career in the FBI Laboratory. He will explain how he and other intelligence analysts use forensic science to study how criminals and terrorists construct bombs and other improvised explosive devices.

English joined the FBI Explosive Unit in 1990, where he assisted with the examination of explosives-related evidence. In 2000, he joined the FBI Bomb Data Center and Hazardous Devices Response Unit as an intelligence analyst, and in 2004, he became an intelligence analyst and forensic-request coordinator with the FBI's TEDAC laboratory.

English has been the recipient of numerous FBI awards for his outstanding scientific work on the 1998 U.S. Embassy bombings in Tanzania, the 1996 TWA Flight 800 crash, the 1995 bombing of the Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, and the 1993 World Trade Center bombing.

English received his Bachelor of Science degree from Juniata College in 1998. In that same year, he received a degree from the Hazardous Devices School at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Ala.

The Penn State 2010 Forensic Science Lecture Series is sponsored by the Penn State Eberly College of Science. For more information, contact the Forensic Science Program at 814-863-6758 or send an e-mail to kml142@psu.edu.

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Last Updated November 18, 2010