Simpson lecture set for Jan. 30

Shiv Grewal, chief of the Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the head of the Chromosome Biology Section of the Center for Cancer Research at the National Cancer Institute, will present the 2011-12 Robert T. Simpson Memorial Lecture in Molecular Medicine at 5 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 30, in 100 Life Sciences Building on the Penn State University Park campus.

This free public lecture titled "Heterochromatin assembly and epigenetic genome control of non-coding and coding RNAs" will focus on how genes are controlled by small sections of RNA, which bind to and alter parts of the genome. The lecture is sponsored by Penn State's Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

Grewal began his scientific career at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom, where he held the Cambridge-Nehru scholarship. In 1993, after earning a doctoral degree at the University of Cambridge, he joined the National Cancer Institute in the United States as a postdoctoral fellow to pursue his interest in the control of gene expression. In 1998, Grewal joined Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, and in 2003, he returned to the National Cancer Institute as a senior investigator. Grewal and his colleagues have revolutionized the current thinking on how complex genomes are assembled, and their contribution to genomic research was selected as the Breakthrough of the Year in 2002 by Science magazine. In addition, three of Grewal's scientific papers have been cited as historic discoveries over the past 50 years by the journal Nature. Grewal is the recipient of the prestigious Newcomb-Cleveland Prize, a National Institutes of Health Merit Award, and a National Institutes of Health Directors Award.

The Robert T. Simpson Lectureship honors Robert T. Simpson and is made possible through donations from his family, friends, colleagues, and associates. Simpson was an international leader for more than 35 years in research on chromatin, a fundamental component of chromosomes, and its role in gene regulation. Simpson worked at the National Institutes of Health from 1970 until 1995, when he became the Verne M. Willaman Professor of Molecular Biology at Penn State University. His addition to Penn State in 1995 is considered to have placed Penn State and the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the forefront of chromatin research and to have greatly enhanced Penn State's research and educational missions.

For more information about the lecture or for access assistance, contact the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at 814-865-3072.

 

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Last Updated January 23, 2012