Penn State Equine Science Showcase and Quarter Horse Sale April 28

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. -- The 10th anniversary edition of the Equine Science Showcase and Quarter Horse Sale will be held from 8:30 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. on April 28 in the Snider Agricultural Arena on Penn State's University Park campus.

The event is run solely by students in the Equine Marketing and the Horse Handling and Training classes in the College of Agricultural Sciences.

Students from the marketing class will be on hand to manage a wide range of activities, and members of the handling and training class will ride the horses for sale during the event.

"Together these groups exhibit their hard work on sale day when a number of Penn State horses will be sold," said Dustin Dreyfuss, a senior in Agribusiness Management who is one of the two sale managers. "This year, 11 two-year-olds, one three-year-old and two mares will be sold to buyers who attend the event."

Doors open at 8:30 a.m. for attendees and prospective buyers to view the horses. During the day, there will be a demonstration of the sale horses, during which current and former students from the handling and training class will display the animals' training level and quality of movement.

Preceding the 2 p.m. sale will be comments from the dean of the College of Agricultural Sciences and the head of the Dairy and Animal Science Department, as well as from U.S. Rep. Glenn Thompson.

Educational displays by student clubs, exhibits focused on student research projects and commercial displays from sale sponsors will be featured in the arena. Students also will offer tours through the Penn State horse barns.

"This year also marks the 50th consecutive year that Penn State has registered at least one American Quarter Horse Association foal," Dreyfuss said. "The university received the Legacy Award from the association this past fall in recognition of reaching the 50-year mark."

Brian Egan, instructor in dairy and animal science, who teaches the Equine Marketing class and the Horse Handling and Training class, has been involved with the sale since it first began in 2002. He points out that the sale is a valuable experience for students.

"They get the opportunity to be involved with a very large and successful event, which is a real-life situation," he said. "They learn about the marketing of horses to some extent, but they also learn how to plan, coordinate and implement an event like this."

Equine Marketing class students learn marketing concepts primarily through the planning and implementation of the showcase and sale. Students work on a specific part of the event planning through assigned committees.

In the Horse Handling and Training class, students work with Penn State's two-year-old horses to prepare them for the sale and help get them "handled on the ground and started under saddle."

"Industry professionals who come to the event also have the opportunity to see how Penn State students are prepared to become positive members of the workforce," Egan said. "Through this experience, students interact with industry people to promote not only themselves but the Penn State horse program as well.

"I think it's important for people to know about the positive experience that our students have while they are at Penn State and also the real-life educational value that our animals can provide," he said. "If we didn't have the horse herd here on campus, our students would not be afforded this hands-on opportunity."

Contacts: 
Last Updated April 23, 2012