College of Education awards Research Initiation Grants

Six College of Education faculty members were awarded Research Initiation Grants (RIGs) this academic year. The 2011–12 award winners were as follows:

Fall 2011 Faculty Recipients

-- Charles Hughes, professor of special education, was awarded based on his proposal, “Using Graphic Organizers in Intermediate and Secondary Classrooms: Teacher Perceptions and Practice.”

-- David Gamson, assistant professor of education theory and policy, was awarded for his proposal, “Democracy Undone: Educational Reform and the Civic Purposes of Instruction, 1960–2010.”

-- Kimberly Griffin, assistant professor of college student affairs, received a grant for her proposal, “Behind the Office Door: An Exploration of the Interactions Constituting Faculty Mentoring Relationships in Higher Education.”

-- Pamela Wolfe, associate professor of special education, received a grant for her proposal, “Socio-Sexual Decision Making for Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD): An Assessment of Parent and Teacher Perceptions.”


Spring 2012 Faculty Recipients

-- Esther Prins, associate professor of adult education, received a grant based on her proposal, “Health literacy in parents of low-SES minority group school-age children with ADHD.”

-- Rayne Sperling, associate professor of educational psychology, was awarded a grant based on her proposal, “Working the Examples: What, Why, When, How, and for Whom?”

The Research Initiation Grant program is designed to aid faculty members in the College of Education prepare full research studies by funding preliminary research and investigation in anticipation of pursuing external funding.

All tenured and tenure-track faculty of the College of Education at University Park are eligible to apply for RIGs. The grants may be used to support travel to libraries or research sites, to collect and analyze data, to develop instrumentation, to meet with potential sponsors, to seek a release from teaching, to purchase research materials, and/or to fund a research assistant. For more information, visit the RIG website.

Fourteen Student RIGs Awarded

In a separate RIG initiative, 14 doctoral students received Student Dissertation Research Initiation Grants this academic year. These grants are funded through the generosity of the Office of the Dean of the College of Education to help fund research for student dissertations. Student RIGs are given in amounts up to $600.

This year, a larger number of Student RIGs were awarded; in past years, a maximum of 10 awards were given. Recipients in 2011–12 were as follows:
Fall 2011 Student Recipients

-- Michael Chestnut received a grant for his proposal, “Title: Exploring the Experiences and Meaning Making of Foreign English Teachers in South Korea.”

-- Emily Crawford was awarded a grant for her proposal, “What Makes Sense? How Educators Make Sense of Contexts Involving Immigration and Customs.”

-- Rodney Hughes received a grant based on his proposal, “Essays on Enrollment Matching and Associated Higher Education Outcomes.”

-- Junghawn Kim received a grant for his proposal, “Empowering Community Leadership and Learning: A Socio-Cultural Investigation of Activities in an Urban Korean–American Community Organization.”

-- Tiffanie Lewis was awarded a grant for her proposal, “Principals' Perspectives on Autonomy in NYC Schools.”

-- Nalova Westbrook received a grant for her proposal, “Tensions of Teaching Media Literacy in Teacher.”

Spring 2012 Student Recipients

-- Jessica Arends received a grant for her proposal, “Faculty Reflections on Global Service Learning.”

-- Peter Buckland was awarded with a grant for his proposal, “Policy Entrepreneur's Environmental Identities in Sustainability Education Policy.”

-- Wen-Min Hsieh was awarded with a grant for the proposal, “An exploration study of L2 teachers' pedagogical decisions on technology activities.”

-- Keiwana Jones received a grant for her proposal, “Black Greek-Lettered Organizations: A Legacy of African American Adult Education.”

-- Andrew Koricich received a grant for his proposal, “Community Effects on Postsecondary Education Attendance, Choice, and Completion Among Rural American Students.“

-- Michelle Salopek was awarded a grant for her proposal, “Influence of Ethics Training on Moral Reasoning among Preservice Education and Social Work Students.”

-- Victor Sensenig was awarded a grant for her proposal, “Libraries and Literacy from an Ecological Perspective.”

-- Travis York received a grant for his proposal, “Exploring Service-Learning Outcomes and Experiences for Low-Income, First-Generation College Students: A Mixed-Methods Approach.”

Students must be enrolled at University Park and must be at the dissertation level to apply. Each fall and spring semester, a call for proposals is made via e-mail and posted on the College's digital signs. More information is available online.

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Last Updated April 25, 2012