SLEIC 2

SLEIC 2

Michael Wenger, director of the Human Electrophysiology Facility (HEF), explains how scientists can use skin-surface EEG readings to study how the brain works. Using 32- and 128-channel electrode arrays, like the one he is holding, the HEF lab records electroencephalograms, or EEGs -- which demonstrate small changes in bioelectrical activity in the brain -- on subjects ranging from infants to aging populations, to study a wide array of topics including message processing and motion perception.

Image: Penn State
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